BLOGS


Music and Court Culture in Late Medieval Catalonia by David Catalunya

Our understanding of medieval culture vastly relies on fragmentary sources. Musicologists are especially well-acquainted with this — most historians working on pre-1500 music rely to a significant extent on ‘waste’ parchment as a source of information about lost musical cultures. Working with fragments is challenging; however, it can also yield […]


Re-visiting the concept of the ‘musical work’. Part II: My project, the Renaissance Musical Work by Soterraña Aguirre Rincón

As I mentioned in my previous post, the research project The Renaissance Musical Work: Fundamentals, Repertoires and Practices, carried out by the Contrapunto team, is based on the study of ‘other’ sources, environments and kinds of music that are little used in general music historiography. Now, I would like to present some of these.


Re-visiting the concept of the ‘musical work’. Part I: Why collaborate with MALMECC? by Soterraña Aguirre Rincón

Do we need the concept of the ‘musical work’ to make a music history? This is a simple question to which it is not easy to offer an answer. If we answer it restrictively, we would have to say that its use is only relevant for the study of the music of the 19th century and much of the 20th century. But it is also quite possible that we might accept its validity for music from the 15th century onwards…


Meet Grantley…

Interview with Grantley McDonald, Post-doc researcher on the MALMECC project What attracted you to this project? I have been working on a large-scale project on the court chapel of Maximilian I Habsburg (1459–1519) since 2016. At every turn I became aware how much its structures, practices and personnel drew on […]